Protect the seas

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Marine biologist and fish enthusiast. just trying to save the world one fish at a time.

lifeunderthewaves:

Under the sea by laetitiametayer

lifeunderthewaves:

Under the sea by laetitiametayer

— 1 week ago with 46 notes

thelovelyseas:

(via shychemist)

— 1 week ago with 5841 notes

griseus:

Generally, larval fishes do not show such a specialized morphology but a morphology which facilitates suction feeding. This is not the case in seahorses: larvae from one day old, after leaving the male brooding pouch and starting foerage idependently, already show this strongly specialized morphology. 

Short Snouted Seahorse (Hippocampus guttulatus) Larvae. First was extracted from male and second normal larval.

(via buzzxlightyear)

— 1 week ago with 15 notes
waterbody:

red abalone. cleaned in 2010 / FH20 / (home made light box beta test)

waterbody:

red abalone. cleaned in 2010 / FH20 / (home made light box beta test)

— 1 week ago with 24 notes
shitalwayshitsyou:

lawandcatsxo:

capriciouslydeceptive:

mikeonice2010:

ketchuppee:

geekycrap:

4gifs:

Waterbears can go without food or water for more than a decade. They can survive temperatures from zero to above the boiling point of water, pressure six times stronger than the deepest ocean trench, radiation hundreds of times higher than the fatal dose for a human, and the vacuum of space.

but everything comes at a priceson of a bitch looks like a dick

Guys you don’t know the half it. Tardigrades, or waterbears, (or moss piglets, how cute is that?) are the coolest things in the entire world. They pretty much live everywhere on earth, and all they do is amble around drinking water. But if their life is in danger, they shrivel up into this little raisin thing and they can survive practically anything. There was a piece of moss sitting dry in a museum for a century. Some scientists wetted the moss, and they woke back up. Just started drinking the water again. They have survived as near to absolute zero as science has allowed us to get. They’ve woken up after being subjected to 6 times the radiation lethal to humans, even though they are about 3 millimeters in length on average. NASA sent them into orbit and they were released into the vacuum of space for ten days. They woke up. So what does this mean? Scientists believe this may help to prove the existence of live elsewhere in the universe, and how life came to Earth. If there are creatures that can survive the emptiness of space, who’s to say an asteroid didn’t carry some from one planet to ours?

So cool…..still looks like a penis.

Cute as fuck

Dying.

Cutest dick ever

shitalwayshitsyou:

lawandcatsxo:

capriciouslydeceptive:

mikeonice2010:

ketchuppee:

geekycrap:

4gifs:

Waterbears can go without food or water for more than a decade. They can survive temperatures from zero to above the boiling point of water, pressure six times stronger than the deepest ocean trench, radiation hundreds of times higher than the fatal dose for a human, and the vacuum of space.

but everything comes at a price
son of a bitch looks like a dick

Guys you don’t know the half it. Tardigrades, or waterbears, (or moss piglets, how cute is that?) are the coolest things in the entire world.
They pretty much live everywhere on earth, and all they do is amble around drinking water. But if their life is in danger, they shrivel up into this little raisin thing and they can survive practically anything.
There was a piece of moss sitting dry in a museum for a century. Some scientists wetted the moss, and they woke back up. Just started drinking the water again.
They have survived as near to absolute zero as science has allowed us to get.
They’ve woken up after being subjected to 6 times the radiation lethal to humans, even though they are about 3 millimeters in length on average.
NASA sent them into orbit and they were released into the vacuum of space for ten days. They woke up.
So what does this mean? Scientists believe this may help to prove the existence of live elsewhere in the universe, and how life came to Earth. If there are creatures that can survive the emptiness of space, who’s to say an asteroid didn’t carry some from one planet to ours?

So cool…..still looks like a penis.

Cute as fuck

Dying.

Cutest dick ever

(via holidayforhanging)

— 3 weeks ago with 127751 notes
mad-as-a-marine-biologist:

Peek inside a Leatherback Turtle’s (Dermochelys coriacea) mouth: How to eat jelly fish when your mouth is an exquisitely evolved jellyfish deathbed. 
We know turtles like to eat jellyfish, and the Leatherback likes them most of all. However, this is the biggest turtle, consuming a prey that extremely low nutritional value, therefore it has to nom on a lot of them. As it does so, it takes in saltwater as well. The jellies and the saltwater get stored in the esophagus. 
What happens next you ask? Is it to do with the horrific looking backwards facing spines that don’t look comfortable in anything’s mouth? 
But of course! Because that is the beauty of evolution, the refined logic of adaptation. 
The muscles of the esophagus squeeze the seawater out of the mouth and the spines, which get progressively larger down the esophagus, hold the jellyfish in place. Once all the water is gone, the jellies are passed into the stomach. 
This is one of the many *awesome* characteristics of the leatherback turtle - trawling for jellyfish on this earth for over 90 million year. 
Trawling for fish/shrimp (by humans, not leatherbacks), is one of the reasons Leatherbacks are classified as Critically Endangered by the IUCN Red List. 
Source: Evolution FB

mad-as-a-marine-biologist:

Peek inside a Leatherback Turtle’s (Dermochelys coriacea) mouth: How to eat jelly fish when your mouth is an exquisitely evolved jellyfish deathbed. 

We know turtles like to eat jellyfish, and the Leatherback likes them most of all. However, this is the biggest turtle, consuming a prey that extremely low nutritional value, therefore it has to nom on a lot of them. As it does so, it takes in saltwater as well. The jellies and the saltwater get stored in the esophagus. 

What happens next you ask? Is it to do with the horrific looking backwards facing spines that don’t look comfortable in anything’s mouth? 

But of course! Because that is the beauty of evolution, the refined logic of adaptation. 

The muscles of the esophagus squeeze the seawater out of the mouth and the spines, which get progressively larger down the esophagus, hold the jellyfish in place. Once all the water is gone, the jellies are passed into the stomach. 

This is one of the many *awesome* characteristics of the leatherback turtle - trawling for jellyfish on this earth for over 90 million year. 

Trawling for fish/shrimp (by humans, not leatherbacks), is one of the reasons Leatherbacks are classified as Critically Endangered by the IUCN Red List. 

Source: Evolution FB

(via lamarckwaswrong)

— 3 weeks ago with 1625 notes
griseus:

Which marine mammals dive the deepest?

A new long-term study of elusive Cuvier’s beaked whale shows they can dive to nearly 3,000m (10,000 feet) while a second stayed down for 138 minutes.
awesome

Reference (Open Access) : Schorr et al 2014 First Long-Term Behavioral Records from Cuvier’s Beaked Whales (Ziphius cavirostris) Reveal Record-Breaking Dives. PLoS ONE 9(3): e92633. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0092633

griseus:

Which marine mammals dive the deepest?

A new long-term study of elusive Cuvier’s beaked whale shows they can dive to nearly 3,000m (10,000 feet) while a second stayed down for 138 minutes.

awesome

(via mad-as-a-marine-biologist)

— 3 weeks ago with 451 notes
elletiburon:

sometimes when I’m angry or stressed or sad I think about whales just swimming around in the ocean, doing whale shit. like, they’re the biggest goddamn mammals on the planet. they don’t have time for little problems. there’s too much chill-ass whale shit to do.
basically what I am saying is that whales are my happy place.

elletiburon:

sometimes when I’m angry or stressed or sad I think about whales just swimming around in the ocean, doing whale shit. like, they’re the biggest goddamn mammals on the planet. they don’t have time for little problems. there’s too much chill-ass whale shit to do.

basically what I am saying is that whales are my happy place.

(Source: pacificasun, via someoneelsesflowers)

— 3 weeks ago with 213755 notes
spottedsharkheart:

thejunglenook:


Understanding Phylogenies: TerminologyBY EEPUCKETT MARCH 22, 2014
To understand phylogenies let’s start with some basic terminology (Figure 1).Taxon (plural: taxa): the species/candy bars we will infer relationships between in a phylogenyTips: the terminal unit in the phylogeny. There will be one tip for every taxon included in the phylogeny.Node: point that joins two groups together. Nodes represent the most recent common ancestor of the two groups that were joined.Branch: the portion of the tree that joins tips and nodes, or nodes with other nodes. In a cladogram, branches are equidistant between nodes; while in a phylogeny representing time, the length of the branch estimates the amount of time that has passed between evolutionary events.Clade: A group of similar taxa. Figure 1 represents the peanut clade.Traits: information about the taxa that may be unique to a single taxon or shared by multiple taxa.

Figure 1- Phylogeny terminology using the peanut clade. This clade has three tips represented by the three candy bar taxa. The clade has five branches and two nodes.
Biologists describe how clades are related to each other using the following terms:Sister taxa: Two taxa (could be one or multiple species/candy bars) that arise from a common node. (Example- Mounds and Almond Joy in Figure 2) [see above]Monophyletic: A clade formed by all of the species/candy bars sharing a common ancestral node. (Example- M&Ms are monophyletic)Paraphyletic: A group of taxon descended from a common ancestral node that does not include all of the taxa descended from that node.Polyphyletic: A group formed by shared traits even when a single common ancestral node is not shared. (Example- In Figure 2 peanuts independently arise three times on the candy bar phylogeny)
(Full article)

Now I just need to do this with my beverages of choice…

I am going to use this for my AP Biology class!!

spottedsharkheart:

thejunglenook:

Understanding Phylogenies: Terminology
 

To understand phylogenies let’s start with some basic terminology (Figure 1).
Taxon (plural: taxa): the species/candy bars we will infer relationships between in a phylogeny
Tips: the terminal unit in the phylogeny. There will be one tip for every taxon included in the phylogeny.
Node: point that joins two groups together. Nodes represent the most recent common ancestor of the two groups that were joined.
Branch: the portion of the tree that joins tips and nodes, or nodes with other nodes. In a cladogram, branches are equidistant between nodes; while in a phylogeny representing time, the length of the branch estimates the amount of time that has passed between evolutionary events.
Clade: A group of similar taxa. Figure 1 represents the peanut clade.
Traits: information about the taxa that may be unique to a single taxon or shared by multiple taxa.

Figure 1- Phylogeny terminology using the peanut clade. This clade has three tips represented by the three candy bar taxa. The clade has five branches and two nodes.


Biologists describe how clades are related to each other using the following terms:
Sister taxa: Two taxa (could be one or multiple species/candy bars) that arise from a common node. (Example- Mounds and Almond Joy in Figure 2) [see above]
Monophyletic: A clade formed by all of the species/candy bars sharing a common ancestral node. (Example- M&Ms are monophyletic)
Paraphyletic: A group of taxon descended from a common ancestral node that does not include all of the taxa descended from that node.
Polyphyletic: A group formed by shared traits even when a single common ancestral node is not shared. (Example- In Figure 2 peanuts independently arise three times on the candy bar phylogeny)


(Full article)

Now I just need to do this with my beverages of choice…

I am going to use this for my AP Biology class!!

— 3 weeks ago with 387 notes
aquaristlifeforme:

This is one of our new Yellow Stingrays. She came in from Florida almost directly from the wild. She has been with us for two weeks already and had not eaten yet, until today!! I’m so happy! I was getting so worried about her. I named her Avalon.

aquaristlifeforme:

This is one of our new Yellow Stingrays. She came in from Florida almost directly from the wild. She has been with us for two weeks already and had not eaten yet, until today!! I’m so happy! I was getting so worried about her. I named her Avalon.

— 1 month ago with 6 notes